Topic

Rape, Acid Attack & Torture

Briefing
Getting Away With It – 2016 Update

November 28, 2016audio available

A year ago, to mark the 2015 16 Days Against Gender Based Violence campaign, LICADHO published a report Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia’s Justice System. The report was based on cases investigated by LICADHO in 2012, 2013 and 2014 and found that there were grave and systemic flaws in how rape cases are prosecuted in Cambodia and as a result, a disturbingly low number of convictions. There were several reasons for this: the extensive use of financial compensation to settle cases, widespread corruption amongst the police and the judiciary, poor understanding and application of the law by judges, and the prevalence of discriminatory attitudes towards women.

Audio
Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia's Justice System

March 7, 2016

Tomorrow is International Women’s Day. To mark the event LICADHO is releasing a new audio book and summary audio clip titled Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia’s Justice System. Both the book and the summary present evidence of the immense failure of the Cambodian justice system to properly investigate and prosecute cases of rape involving women and children. They provide details of multiple systemic flaws – corruption, discriminatory attitudes towards women and girls, misinterpretation of the law, and lack of resources – which, together, mean that many perpetrators of rape receive only very lenient punishment or go completely unpunished.

Audio Book
Unite against Impunity for Rape in Cambodia Radio Show

January 11, 2016audio available

This audio book contains the edited highlights of a radio show that was originally broadcast during the 2015 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign. The show, titled "Unite against Impunity for Rape in Cambodia" accompanied publication of the report "Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia's Justice System" and includes a discussion of the main findings and recommendations of the report as well as an interview with the father of a rape victim.

Report
Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia's Justice System

November 29, 2015

Today, to mark the global campaign 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, which began on November 25 and runs until December 10, LICADHO is publishing a new report Getting Away With It: The Treatment of Rape in Cambodia’s Justice System. The report presents evidence of the immense failure of the Cambodian justice system to properly investigate and prosecute cases of rape involving women and children. It provides details of multiple systemic flaws – corruption, discriminatory attitudes towards women and girls, misinterpretation of the law, and lack of resources – which, together, mean that many perpetrators of rape receive only very lenient punishment or go completely unpunished.

Opinion
Finding justice for women, children victims of sex crimes

August 12, 2015

In response to the article "Provincial cop ‘still on job’ despite sentencing" (Phnom Penh Post, 11 August 2015), LICADHO commends Mr Yun Bunly for his remarkable courage and principle in pursuing the case against Korng Sophat, the police officer convicted of raping his 11-year old daughter in 2010. Immediately after committing the crime, Sophat offered Mr Bunly and his family a sizeable sum of money to drop the complaint against him. Instead the family chose to pursue the case through the courts but five years later they have been woefully failed by Cambodia’s justice system.

Report
Torture and Ill-Treatment: Testimony from Inside Cambodia's Police Stations and Prisons

June 26, 2014

On June 26, International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, LICADHO releases new testimony and analysis of torture and ill-treatment in Cambodia’s police stations and prisons, including the abuse of females and juveniles and those experiencing mental health problems.

Article
Acid Attacks in Cambodia Continue to go Unchecked

January 29, 2010

Acid attacks have become an increasingly common form of violence in Cambodia in recent years. This particularly vicious method of attack is generally directed against women, often by their own husbands, or the wives of their lovers, with the most common motive being jealousy or revenge for perceived infidelities. There are, however, countless other motives for such attacks, with male and female perpetrators and victims. The attacks are almost always premeditated, as the perpetrators must take the time to acquire caustic acids. Unfortunately, these chemicals are typically inexpensive and readily available on the open market. Acid is very popular weapon given that it almost invisible to the police and the public.

Statement Detained Policeman Transferred to Hospital because of Poor Health

March 25, 2008

Pring Pov, the Kep policeman who has been unlawfully detained for more than one month by the Ministry of Interior, was sent by police to Monivong Hospital yesterday. The Cambodia Human Rights and Development Organization (ADHOC) and the Cambodian League for Defense and Promotion of Human Rights (LICADHO) are deeply concerned for his health and once more call for his immediate release.

Pring Pov, a district police officer in Kep municipality, was arrested without court warrant on February 18, 2008, and has subsequently been detained in a cell by the Order Police at a Ministry of Interior compound in Phnom Penh. He has been beaten and kept in handcuffs for at least some of that time, according to credible information received by ADHOC and LICADHO.

Statement Unlawful Detention & Alleged Torture by Ministry of Interior

March 11, 2008

The Cambodian League for the Defense and Promotion of Human Rights (LICADHO) is gravely concerned by the unlawful detention and alleged torture of a man in the custody of the Ministry of Interior.

Mr Priep Pov, a Damnak Chang’aeur district policeman from Kep Municipality, was arrested without court warrant in Kep on February 18. Transferred to Phnom Penh on the same day, he has since been detained for three weeks at a compound used by the Ministry of Interior's Order Police and the Intervention Police units. He has been beaten and kept shackled with handcuffs by foot and hand for at least some of that time, and is in poor health, according to credible information received by LICADHO.

Statement More action needed as Anti-Torture Laws ignored

June 26, 2007

For more than a decade Cambodia has failed to honor its obligations to prevent and punish the use of torture, and strong action is needed to tackle the widespread practice, according to LICADHO.

"Torture is committed every day in Cambodia, and most torturers are not punished in any way," LICADHO president Kek Galabru said on June 26, the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. "Cambodia is blatantly violating its obligations under international and domestic laws, and it is time that the government, police and courts took real action to stop the barbaric practice of torture."

Cambodia ratified the UN Convention Against Torture in 1992 but has failed to properly implement it. Early this year, the government also signed on to an additional international human rights treaty, the Optional Protocol to the Convention Against Torture, which contains further obligations to prevent torture.

Article
More prosecutions needed to eradicate torture in Cambodia

July 26, 2006

On Friday, July 21, the Phnom Penh Municipal Court convicted six police officers of voluntary manslaughter for the death of Duong Sopheap, who died after being detained at the Phnom Penh Municipal Police's Minor Crimes Office in June 2005. All six, who were arrested by Ministry of Interior officers six months after Duong Sopheap's death, were sentenced to 12 years in prison.

Following the unprecedented sentences given last week to the six police officers for their roles in the torture and death of a woman in police custody, LICADHO urges greater action to investigate and prosecute other similar cases of torture in Cambodia.

Statement More prosecutions needed to eradicate torture

July 25, 2006

Following the unprecedented 12-year prison sentences given last week to six Phnom Penh police officers for their roles in the torture and death of a woman in police custody, LICADHO urges greater action to investigate and prosecute other similar cases of torture.

"For the first time in years, if not decades, police officers have been convicted and sentenced to long prison terms for their involvement in torture," said Kek Galabru, LICADHO's president. "But one prosecution alone does not indicate a meaningful change in the official attitude toward the use of torture - the authorities must also prosecute other similar cases if they are serious about eliminating torture in Cambodia."

Statement Indepentent Police Complaints Body Needed

June 29, 2005

Cambodia should establish an independent body to receive and investigate complaints of torture and other abuses committed by police officers, according to LICADHO.

"Torture is all too common in Cambodia and it is time for meaningful action to prevent and punish this brutal practice," said Kek Galabru on June 26, the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture. "Establishing an independent agency to investigate such abuses committed by the police is long overdue."

Article Women, children face sex crimes crisis

March 10, 2005

Cambodian women and children are facing a rising tide of sex crimes and urgent action is needed to stop abuse, a rights group warned on Monday.

Rape and indecent assault cases have risen steadily in recent years, and many of the victims are children, some as young as four years old, local human rights group Licadho said ahead of International Woman's Day on Tuesday.

Article Military police officer in Sihanoukville convicted of rape and robbery, sentenced to 15 years

September 16, 2004

On Monday 13 September, Sihanoukville Provincial Court ruled that Military Police Officer Khun Torn was guilty of raping and robbing a Canadian tourist at gun point.